Sunday, August 20, 2017

A new cathedral named for St. Teresa of Calcutta(Mother Teresa)

Kosovo to dedicate cathedral named for Mother Teresa
A view of the Cathedral of St. Teresa of Kolkata is seen in Pristina, Kosovo, in this 2010 file photo. The cathedral is scheduled to be dedicated Sept. 5 on the 20th anniversary of her death. CNS photo/Valdrin Xhemaj, EPA
A view of the Cathedral of St. Teresa of Kolkata is seen in Pristina, Kosovo, in this 2010 file photo. The cathedral is scheduled to be dedicated Sept. 5 on the 20th anniversary of her death. CNS photo/Valdrin Xhemaj, EPA

By Jonathan Luxmoore | Catholic News Service
A cathedral named for St. Teresa of Kolkata is scheduled to be dedicated in Kosovo on the 20th anniversary of her death.
The cathedral will be dedicated Sept. 5 in Pristina. Albanian-born Cardinal Ernest Simoni will represent Pope Francis at the dedication. Celebrations of the neo-classical cathedral, on Pristina's Bill Clinton Boulevard, will begin Aug. 26, the saint's birthday.
"This will be a great event for our church and all people, whatever their faith and background," said Msgr. Shan Zefi, chancellor of Kosovo's Prizren-based Catholic apostolic administration. "Mother Teresa was a unifying figure who worked among Christians and Muslims and was admired by everyone. A cathedral in her honor is a great gift for this country."
He said Catholics were grateful to Kosovo's government for backing the cathedral; its foundation stone was laid in 2005 by the late President Ibrahim Rugova, a Muslim.
"Bishops will come from throughout the region, as well as Muslim and Orthodox leaders, in a sign of majority approval," Msgr. Zefi said.
"St. Teresa's sisters have worked for many years here and enjoyed strong support, especially at a time of unemployment and hardship."
Mostly ethnic Albanian Muslims make up at least 90 percent of the 2.1 million inhabitants of Kosovo, whose 2008 independence from Serbia has been recognized by 111 of the United Nations' 193 member-states, but not by the Vatican.
The Catholic apostolic administration, founded in 2000 with 24 parishes, officially accounts for 3.5 percent of the population, although church leaders put numbers higher.
The cathedral was daubed in Islamist graffiti at its September 2010 opening. However, Msgr. Zefi insisted opposition had come "only from a few individuals."
"Our church's ties with Kosovo's Islamic community are developing toward ever greater dialogue and tolerance," he said.
Once fully completed, the building will have two 230-foot bell towers, making it one of the city's largest, as well as a stained-glass window depicting St. Teresa with St. John Paul II, and will become the seat of a full Catholic diocese, relocated from Prizren.

Saturday, August 19, 2017

Abbot, Doctor, Saint, not from da parish

St. Bernard of Clairvaux

Image of St. Bernard of Clairvaux

Facts

Feastday: August 20
Death: 1153


St. Bernard, Abbot and Doctor of the Church St. Bernard was born of noble parentage in Burgundy, France, in the castle of Fontaines near Dijon. Under the care of his pious parents he was sent at an early age to a college at Chatillon, where he was conspicuous for his remarkable piety and spirit of recollection. At the same place he entered upon the studies of theology and Holy Scripture. After the death of his mother, fearing the snares and temptations of the world, he resolved to embrace the newly established and very austere institute of the Cistercian Order, of which he was destined to become the greatest ornament. He also persuaded his brothers and several of his friends to follow his example. In 1113, St. Bernard, with thirty young noblemen, presented himself to the holy Abbot, St. Stephen, at Citeaux. After a novitiate spent in great fervor, he made his profession in the following year. His superior soon after, seeing the great progress he had made in the spiritual life, sent him with twelve monks to found a new monastery, which afterward became known as the celebrated Abbey of Clairvaux. St. Bernard was at once appointed Abbot and began that active life which has rendered him the most conspicuous figure in the history of the 12th century. He founded numerous other monasteries, composed a number of works and undertook many journeys for the honor of God. Several Bishoprics were offered him, but he refused them all. The reputation of St. Bernard spread far and wide; even the Popes were governed by his advice. He was commissioned by Pope Eugene III to preach the second Crusade. In obedience to the Sovereign Pontiff he traveled through France and Germany, and aroused the greatest enthusiasm for the holy war among the masses of the population. The failure of the expedition raised a great storm against the saint, but he attributed it to the sins of the Crusaders. St. Bernard was eminently endowed with the gift of miracles. He died on August 20, 1153. His feast day is August 20.

Friday, August 18, 2017

Helped devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus

St. John Eudes


Image of St. John Eudes

Facts

Feastday: August 19
Birth: 1601
Death: 1680


John Eudes was born at Ri, Normandy, France, on November 14, 1601, the son of a farmer. He went to the Jesuit college at Caen when he was 14, and despite his parents' wish that he marry, joined the Congregation of the Oratory of France in 1623. He studied at Paris and at Aubervilliers, was ordained in 1625, and worked as a volunteer, caring for the victims of the plagues that struck Normandy in 1625 and 1631, and spent the next decade giving Missions, building a reputation as an outstanding preacher and confessor and for his opposition to Jansenism. He became interested in helping fallen women, and in 1641, with Madeleine Lamy, founded a refuge for them in Caen under the direction of the Visitandines. He resigned from the Oratorians in 1643 and founded the Congregation of Jesus and Mary (the Eudists) at Caen, composed of secular priests not bound by vows but dedicated to upgrading the clergy by establishing effective seminaries and to preaching missions. His foundation was opposed by the Oratorians and the Jansenists, and he was unable to obtain Papal approval for it, but in 1650, the Bishop of Coutances invited him to establish a seminary in that diocese. The same year the sisters at his refuge in Caen left the Visitandines and were recognized by the Bishop of Bayeux as a new congregation under the name of Sisters of Our Lady of Charity of the Refuge.
John founded seminaries at Lisieux in 1653 and Rouen in 1659 and was unsuccessful in another attempt to secure Papal approval of his congregation, but in 1666 the Refuge sisters received Pope Alexander III's approval as an institute to reclaim and care for penitent wayward women. John continued giving missions and established new seminaries at Evreux in 1666 and Rennes in 1670. He shared with St. Mary Margaret Alacoque the honor of initiating devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus (he composed the Mass for the Sacred Heart in 1668) and the Holy Heart of Mary, popularizing the devotions with his "The Devotion to the Adorable Heart of Jesus" (1670) and "The Admirable Heart of the Most Holy Mother of God", which he finished a month before his death at Caen on August 19th. He was canonized in 1925. His feast day is August 19th.

Bishop of Richmond Virginia dies


Bishop Francis X. DiLorenzo dies at 75

 
Bishop Francis X. DiLorenzo (Source: Catholic Diocese of Richmond)
Bishop Francis X. DiLorenzo (Source: Catholic Diocese of Richmond)
RICHMOND, VA (WWBT) - Bishop Francis X. DiLorenzo, the 12th bishop of Richmond, died Thursday night at the age of 75 due to heart and kidney failure.


"He was a faithful servant of the Church for 49 years and a Shepherd of the Diocese of Richmond for 13 years," said Monsignor Mark Richard Lane, Diocese of Richmond. "Please pray for the repose of the soul of Bishop DiLorenzo, for his family and friends, and for the people of the Diocese of Richmond."
"Today, the priests, deacons, religious and lay people of the Diocese of Richmond mourn the loss of our shepherd, who led the Diocese with wisdom and humility for 13 years,” said Msgr. Mark Richard Lane. “Bishop DiLorenzo had a profound understanding and faith in the Eucharistic sacrifice of our Lord, which sees past the Cross and into eternal life with our Savior. With that same faith and hope, we look forward to our happy reunion.”
"In March 2004, Pope John Paul II named Bishop DiLorenzo – who was then the shepherd of the Diocese of Honolulu – the Bishop of Richmond. He was installed May 24, 2004," according to a press release from the Catholic Diocese of Richmond.
By the time of his death, he ordained 22 men to the priesthood.
Bishop DiLorenzo was from Philadelphia and was the oldest of three children.
He is survived by his sister, Anita Lawler, of Cape May, N.J., and brother Paul DiLorenzo, of Philadelphia, and close family friend, Sister Janice Johnson, of Allentown, PA.
Information about DiLorenzo's funeral has not been released. 

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Mother of Emperor Constantine; discovered the true Cross

St. Helena

Image of St. Helena

Facts

Feastday: August 18
Death: 330


Empress mother of Constantine the Great. She was a native of Bithynia, who married the then Roman general Constantius I Chlorus about 270. Constantine was born soon after, and in 293, Constantius was made Caesar, or junior emperor. He divorced Helena to marry co Emperor Maximian's stepdaughter. Constantine became emperor in 312 after the fateful victory at Milvian Bridge, and Helena was named Augusta, or empress. She converted to Christianity and performed many acts of charity, including building churches in Rome and in the Holy Land. On a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, Helena discovered the True Cross. She is believed to have died in Nicomedia. Her porphyry sarcophagus is in the Vatican Museum. Geoffrey of Monmouth, England, started the legend that Helena was the daughter of the king of Colchester, a tradition no longer upheld. In liturgical art Helena is depicted as an empress, holding a cross.

Once again he prays for victims of terrorists

Pope Francis Prays for Victims, Families of Barcelona Attack
Greg Burke says Pope is deeply concerned
Pope Francis praying, CTV
Pope Francis praying, CTV
Vatican Press Office Director, Greg Burke, said August 17, 2017 that: “The Holy Father has been deeply concerned about what is happening in Barcelona. The Pope prays for the victims of this attack and wishes to express his closeness to the whole Spanish people, Particularly to the wounded and the families of the victims.
Burke’s statement on behalf of the Holy Father came after a van crashed into a crowd in Las Ramblas, the popular social and tourist area of Barcelona, earlier in the day.  Latest news report say at least 13 are dead and 100 injured in what is believed to be a terrorist attack.  Several news agencies report that Islamic State is claiming responsibility

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Devoted to the Cross, it was imprintd on her heart

St. Clare of Montefalco



Image of St. Clare of Montefalco

Facts

Feastday: August 17
Birth: 1268
Death: 1308


Clare was born at Montefalco, Italy, around 1268. As a young woman she joined a convent of Franciscan tertiaries. This group established Holy Cross Convent at Montefalco in 1290, adopting the Rule of St. Augustine. Clare's sister Joan was the abbess of this community, but at her death Clare succeeded her. She led an austere life, being particularly devoted to the Passion of Christ and His Cross. When Clare died in 1308, an image of the Cross was found imprinted on her heart, and her body remained incorrupt. Whe was canonized in 1881 by Pope Leo XIII. Her feast day is August 17th. The life of St. Clare reminds us that we are all called to a life of prayer and dedication. Still, we must not expect or anticipate special favors. We are to be satisfied with the simple relationship we establish with God.

This is a wonderful response to the Charlottesville episode by Bishop Conley, recalling the actions of Archbishop Rummel of New Orleans

Bishop's Column

Our response to Charlottesville

In the late 1940s, Archbishop Joseph Rummel began the process of ending segregation in the parishes, seminary, and schools of the Archdiocese of New Orleans. He faced real opposition, from families, from teachers, from civil officials, and even some of the priests and religious of his diocese.
Political leaders threatened to end all state financial support for integrated Catholic schools. Catholics wrote to Pope Pius XII asking him to remove Archbishop Rummel from his post. At times, the opposition became violent—A cross was burned on Archbishop Rummel’s lawn; his home was picketed nightly.
In 1959, eight years after segregated Church seating was banned, two black men were beaten by a mob because they sat in the front pews of a New Orleans area parish. Some diocesan officials pleaded with Archbishop Rummel to end his mission. But the archbishop was undeterred.
In 1956, he wrote that racism “is morally wrong and sinful because it is a denial of the unity… of the Redemption. The Eternal Son of God, Christ Jesus our Lord, came into the world to redeem and save all men, to die for all men on the cross, to make the life of grace available through the Church and the Sacraments for all men.” Racism, he wrote, and especially segregation “would draw the color line across the inspiring plan of the Redemption and thus sin against the divine providence, the love and the mercy that conceived and carried out the wonderful Mystery.”
No matter the cost, Archbishop Rummel was committed to ending racial stereotypes and prejudices, which are, he said, “grievous violations of Christian justice and charity.”
Archbishop Rummel died in 1964. By then, the Archdiocese of New Orleans had done away with racial segregation in its institutions. But the evil of racism—which sins against Providence, justice, and charity—remains a powerful force in our country.
Last weekend, white supremacists and neo-Nazis demonstrated in Charlottesville, Virginia. It was the largest such gathering in the United States in decades. They marched across the campus of the University of Virginia, carrying burning torches. They carried vile signs and chanted Nazi slogans. They engaged in violent fights with counter-protestors—in some cases punching or beating black onlookers. And one participant in the protest drove a speeding car through a crowd of people, injuring dozens, and killing one young woman. Please join me in praying for the repose of the soul of that young woman—Heather Heyer—and for all of those who were injured.
Racism, white supremacy, and anti-Semitism are absolutely opposed to the truth of the Gospel. Racism is a dangerous evil: a lie sown by Satan, which seduces, and confuses, and ensnares. The Evil One seeks to divide us from one another and from the Lord, by sowing and exploiting prejudice, stereotypes, and fear.
Regrettably, the white supremacists were not the only ones sowing violence in Charlottesville. A small number of the counter-protestors, but not most of them, were violent, anarchist members of the “antifa” movement, who opposed their racist counterparts with violence. 
We should all be disgusted by the racism of white supremacists. But hatred, expressed in anarchic violence, is the wrong response to injustice. Hatred begets hatred. Violence begets violence. Christians know that evil cannot overcome evil. Only grace can conquer evil.
This weekend, Archbishop Chaput wrote that “Charlottesville matters. It’s a snapshot of our public unraveling into real hatreds brutally expressed; a collapse of restraint and mutual respect now taking place across the country... If we want a different kind of country in the future, we need to start today with a conversion in our own hearts, and an insistence on the same in others. That may sound simple. But the history of our nation and its tortured attitudes toward race proves exactly the opposite.”
Today, our call is to oppose the evil of racism, and the violence begotten by hatred, with the Gospel of Jesus Christ—with the love of the One who came to redeem every human heart. Jesus Christ can free the captives of racism, and Jesus Christ can heal racism’s victims. Our job is to proclaim the truth, mercy, and freedom of life in Jesus Christ. We should not be naïve about how difficult that job really is.
It should be absolutely clear to us that without a massive spiritual renewal in our country, violence, hatred, and chaos will continue unabated. In fact, each one of us must guard our hearts, to ensure that Satan does not sow within us the lie of racism, or use our disgust for racism to make us hateful, vengeful, or violent. 
The only Christian response to the evil that unfolded in Charlottesville is to redouble our prayers for our nation, and to redouble our efforts to build a civilization of love.
More than 60 years ago, Archbishop Rummel worked to combat the evil of racism, because he knew that “Jesus Christ had come to die for all men.” It wasn’t easy, but it was his mission. Today, we are called to do the same. May the Lord give us the grace to build a nation alive in Jesus Christ, which respects the dignity, rights, and beauty of every person, created in the image of God.

Pure joy in Mosul as the Madonna returns

The Madonna returns to Mosul

Safin Hamed | AFP 

 

Photo of the Day: August 16, 2017

An Iraqi Christian man carries Lyon’s Archbishop Cardinal Philippe Barbarin on his shoulders as the clergyman puts up a statue of Virgin Mary on the wall during a visit to the church of the Holy Spirit in east Mosul on July 25, 2017. Barbarin hailed the “rebirth” of Iraq’s devastated main Christian town of Qaraqosh a day earlier, where residents are returning following two years of jihadist rule.
Photographs by Safin Hamed for AFP
Safin Hamed | AFP
Safin Hamed | AFP
Safin Hamed | AFP